The Eddie Project: Iron Maiden – Killers

UP THE IRONS!!

I believe it was late 2022 when CMON Games, the company known for various table top/board games such as Zombicide, announced a collaboration with the legendary English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The announced models would depict various iterations of the band’s mascot, Eddie. As a major fan of the band, I pre-ordered the complete set as soon as I saw the listing without so much as a second thought. 

I began painting them within 24 hours of their delivery. Which was a great feeling, as these models broke a hobby rut that had been killing me for quite some time. Fittingly, I used the Iron Maiden discography as my soundtrack for these hobby sessions. With that, this crossover of the Table Ready and Background Noise series’ was born!

The Eddie Project.


Table Ready: Killer Eddie

Killers(1981)

Eddie saw a change to his image for the Killers album. His spiky vibrant hair was now stark-white, and his almost-ghoulish features were now a lot more demonic. His demeanor is also a lot more psychotic than what was previously seen. The model, much like the previous one, captures all of this from the album artwork perfectly. Though, I will say that this model does differ a bit from the album cover. Unlike the Killers cover, there is no struggling hand of his prey clawing at his shirt. Which I totally understand. They would have had to design a dying victim and fix it into the model. So I can let that slide.

This version of Eddie will pop up at various times in his history. He’ll appear on the cover of the next album, and on the cover of Live After Death* as well. Just to name a couple.

*Live After Death has a model in this series and will be featured later this month! It’s one of my favorites in the model series.

The only thing I changed about this paint job was the hair, really. His clothes were pretty much the same as his predecessor. Though he does have sneakers on now, and his pants are properly cuffed, per the early 80’s style. He has also chosen to replace the broken bottle with an ax. A much more practical instrument of death. Though, this ax is quite chonky.

Seeing as the model is a slight departure from the album artwork, and doesn’t have his victim’s hand gripping his shirt, I decided to put some blood spatter on him. Again, I completely forgot about the new blood paint and went straight for the Blood For The Blood God. For his hair I opted for my go-to off-white/grey color, Grey Seer. Unfortunately, Grey Seer doesn’t have an equivalent in the Two Thin Coats line. Then I used some watered down Nuln Oil before coming back with some Two Thin Coats highlight paint. 


Background Noise: Iron Maiden – Killers

The use of incredible album artwork is something that Iron Maiden has carried with them throughout their entire career. And it doesn’t stop with their LP’s. Singles also get great artwork, and their own versions of Eddie.

Killers is a great album. Though, I wouldn’t say its one of my top albums in their catalog. The production value of this sophomore release is much better than the self titled album, but there are a few songs that just don’t hit with me and I consider skip-able. In their catalog, Iron Maiden definitely has a bunch of songs that I just don’t get behind for various reasons. And that is fine, everyone has their tastes.

Killers, as an album, is a pivot-point for the band. One that saw changes being made not only to their production value but also their lineup. Prior to Killers being released, Adrian Smith would replace Dennis Stratton on guitar. Smith being a current mainstay with the band. This addition and subtraction wouldn’t be the last either. More hefty changes would be coming.

I was born into a scene of angriness and greed, and dominance and persecution.
My mother was a queen, my dad I’ve never seen, I was never meant to be.
And now I spend my time looking all around,
For a man that’s nowhere to be found.
Until I find him I’m never gonna stop searching,
I’m gonna find my man, gonna travel around.

Iron Maiden – Wrathchild

The album kicks off with Ides of March, a very percussive instrumental intro song with a killer solo. Man, I do love me a good instrumental intro. Especially when it kicks right into a great 2nd track. Which Ides of March definitely does, as it leads into Wrathchild. That Steve Harris bass groove right from the top is SO good. Along with the drum groove, they set the table for the rhythm guitar to join in, while the lead soars over it. But seriously, that groove has no rite being that good.

Nah, it totally does.

A one-two punch right from the top of the album

You walk through the subway, my eyes burn a hole in your back,
A footstep behind you, he lunges prepared for attack.
Scream for mercy, he laughs as he’s watching you bleed,
Killer behind you, his blood lust defies all my needs.
Oooh look out, I’m coming for you!
Ahahahaha!

Iron Maiden – Killers

The title track, Killers, is a ride. Like Wrathchild, it starts out again with Harris driving along with the drums as DiAnno yells and screams. The guitars join in with a mysterious pattern. This is all before the song just takes off like a fighter jet. With only a brief interlude in the middle, the song really never takes its foot off of the gas.

KILLER! BEHIND YOU!

Bringing Adrian Smith in was only the beginning of the changes for the band. After Killers, Iron Maiden would be rocking the boat pretty severely. Paul Di’Anno would be replaced by former Samson front-man, Bruce Dickinson for the next album, Number of the Beast.

The Eddie miniatures do not have an entry for Number Of The Beast, which is kind of a shame. Because that may be Eddie’s most powerful form yet in my opinion.

Eddie will return!

Up next: Background Noise: Iron Maiden – Number of the Beast



Robert

All of these are true except for one:

Robert is: a Hobbyist, a Music Lover, an RPG Gamer, a Mustard Lover, Chaotic Neutral, a Japanese Speaker, a Veteran, an Otaku, a Table Tennis Player, an Anime Fan, an Aviation Professional, a New York Rangers Fan, a Chaos Lover With Loyalist Tendencies.

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